American Civil Religion

After my first grade teacher inspired me to become quite the passionate little patriot, I paid much more attention in social studies classes whenever the topic had anything to do with the United States of America. But despite my best intentions, I was easily distracted and given to flights of fancy. Plus, as a Baptist preacher’s kid, I wasn’t all that sure that I should be learning about other religions, so I may have even tried to tune out any teacher who brought up the concept of American civil religion. Whether their lesson plan or not, this was my childish takeaway:

There was a special religion in America that everyone was required to practice, except Jehovah’s Witnesses, because they didn’t have to particiapte in the flag salute. Maybe they weren’t even real Americans after all. Real Americans were all required to practice this mysterious civil religion in addition to their own religion. It wasn’t exactly idolatry, except that there were special statues of heroes in special places, and special buildings that looked like temples, and special songs, and special pledges and oaths, and special books, and special stories that children were required to learn. This special religion mentioned God in some of its songs and stories and on its money, and it even mentioned parts of the Bible — but not Jesus. The symbols it used on its money and on some of the weird temple-like buildings weren’t what I recognized as Christian symbols, but you would get in trouble if you said anything remotely negative about any of them or asked what they meant.

The god of this civil religion kind of seemed like the the One I learned about at home and church, minus Jesus and the Holy Spirit. Plus, the civil religion god was definitely American and only the god of Americans. As a child in a multi-cultural family, this bothered me almost as much as the troubling sense of idolatry.

Of course I was just a little kid then, but some might agree that my childish notions were perhaps not completely far off. Robert N. Bellah wrote:

While some have argued that Christianity is the national faith, and others that church and synagogue celebrate only the generalized religion of “the American Way of Life,” few have realized that there actually exists alongside of and rather clearly differentiated from the churches an elaborate and well-institutionalized civil religion in America. This article argues not only that there is such a thing, but also that this religion-or perhaps better, this religious dimension-has its own seriousness and integrity and requires the same care in understanding that any other religion does.

As an adult, I”m still left with all sorts of puzzling questions. For example: why, in a country where so many speak so eloquently and favorably about the separation of church and state, do so many churches choose to place our country’s flag up front, prominently displayed as if it was a symbol of our faith? Why am I so uncomfortable even asking this question? Why do I fear that it will offend people I hold dear — and will cause others to decry me as unpatriotic and somehow suspect? Why are so many people far more offended by religious symbols and art in “church sanctuaries” — depictions of Biblical themes and the fathers and mothers of our faith — than they are by a national symbol?

A little over two years ago, I wrote the following:

Someone highjacked evangelicalism, and turned it into a political movement. And lots of people are happy to follow along.

I quit. I no longer want to be part of what seems more and more like a political/social/cultural club with semi-Christian overtones. I don’t regret my lifetime spent in evangelicalism; it shaped me in many good ways. I experienced much blessing there, and I consider many evangelicals as my dear brothers and sisters. But, as a movement — at least as how it is being defined, taught, and lived out by its spokespeople — modern evangelicalism has been heading somewhere I don’t want to go.

Until now, I thought I could have my feet in both of my worlds, and be an ecclesiastical mutt of sorts, all Charismatic-Evangelical-Anglo-Cathodox. But I can’t. If I’ve gained anything these past couple years, it’s a far deeper and richer understanding of just how good the Good News — the evangel — is. That’s what draws me and feeds my soul these days.

Sadly, it seems as if the American civil religionists have highjacked evangelicalism. They are co-opting and desanctifying the language and history of Christianity. This is so grievous. A version of “Christianity” that makes no sense outside of America cannot be “the faith which was once for all handed down to the saints”. (Jude 1:3) That faith is good news in all lands, among all peoples and cultures, and throughout all human history.

Some thoughts while “sheltering at home”

I was wrong.

At first, I thought measures being taken against the spread of the Coronavirus were extremist and bizarre. Then I reviewed some of what I’d learned in a long ago Public Health class about the history of virus diseases and virology. I read some articles being written now by leading epidemiologists, consulted the WHO and CDC websites, and examined some of the resources being compiled by trusted friends in the medical field.

That’s when I had to reconsider things.

I’m the caretaker for my elderly, frail parents. I need to be at their home at least 3 times daily, making sure they get their medications and food. Needless to say, they are not leaving the house. We even cancelled respite care for this week; I decided that a “day off” from my duties is an unnecessary luxury for me and risk for my parents.

I understand that for many, the very idea of staying home and not going to work or socializing is simply too awful to contemplate. I get it. I was already feeling stir crazy before the “shelter in place” order was issued for my county and then my state. No one says this will be easy.

But the rest of this is for my professing Christian readers…

This is the season of Lent. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, this might be a good time to find out. It’s a penitential time leading up to Easter. Many of us use this season to pull away from life’s distractions and addictions in order to focus more on Christ, and especially on the meaning of His Crucifixion. It makes Easter all the more glorious.

We “give up” for Lent in order to gain more of Jesus, in order to experience Him more fully.

Some of my friends, now confined to their homes, have commented that this is the greatest Lent ever, and they are fully embracing this opportunity.

This is not an easy time, by any stretch of the imagination, and I am in no way minimizing the suffering of those who are sick, those who have lost loved ones, those who are without income, those facing the the very real possibility of losing their homes, etc. I’m talking to those of us who, like me, are as of yet unscathed and still can’t figure out why our government is taking such extreme measures.

Use this season. Allow God to use it. Be willing to sacrifice. And please, please stay away from people as much as possible, no matter how people-starved we all might be right now. Let me get personal. You may think you just have allergies, or it’s just a cold, or you may even think you are the healthiest person on the planet. But unless I invite you into my life and home as a necessary presence, or as a family member needing to shelter here, this is not a time for in-person socializing. This is not a time to “drop by”. Please don’t disregard the orders you are under where you live, or the advice of those who know a lot more about pandemics and epidemiology than any of us ever will.

I have two dear parents who need me to be healthy. My husband is in that over-65 vulnerable group. I have asthma too (which, thank God, rarely troubles me these days) and pleurisy-scarred lungs, and I’m not exactly youthful. Pray for my parents. Pray for us. Pray for the many who are like me and like my parents. Pray for the many younger people who, thinking this disease posed no threat to them, are now suffering and even dying.

Use this season and any extra time you may have to seek God’s Presence as never before. Regard this as a spiritual retreat. May this Lent be a time of personal renewal for all of us. May it be a time of breakthrough.

Adapted from something I posted on Facebook earlier today.

My only comfort

Beautiful, powerful words that remind me of why I am still a Follower of Jesus. It’s all about redemption, and I’m still holding out for the final chapter of that beautiful story.

And when we forget the real curse that is on the world, we turn Christianity into a weird ethical system that is all about homeschooling, courtship, virginity, tattoos and earrings and power plays and making sure women “know their place” and we forget that it is about redemption.

— Read on myonlycomfort.com/2019/09/03/my-only-comfort/

Sign of a loving heart

The true sign of a loving heart is that it does not give up even if treated as unworthy of any love in return. The sign of a loving heart is that it continues undaunted despite its expressions of love being ignored, rejected, resented, misunderstood, criticized, or maligned. No matter how love is perceived or received, it persists, not in weakness but in strength.

Love does not beg for scraps of affection, for morsels of approval, or for token acts of kindness in return. Love does not grovel, nor is it masochistic. Instead, love lifts up its head, squares its shoulders, and acts with dignity.

Love never fails.

The signs of a loving heart are patience, kindness — in other words, the virtues of Jesus, the embodiment of God’s love. The true sign of a loving heart is that it realizes it is incapable of such holy love, and thus it asks to be a conduit of our Savior’s love. We may fail and fall way short in our bumbling attempts to love well; we may love out of wrong motives; we may offend the very ones we are attempting to love; we may be tempted to give up and retreat to safety; we may find the task of loving our enemies to be a near impossibility; but Christ’s love does not and cannot fail.